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May 17: Classics Revisited

Classics Revisited

Where:  Henry Ford Centennial Library – Second Floor Ford Collection Room
When:  Wednesday, May 17, 7:00 – 8:00 pm


Confessions
by Saint Augustine

Summary

St Augustine’s ‘Confessions’ was written between AD 397-400. An autobiographical work, it was written in thirteen parts, each a complete text intended to be read aloud. Written in his early 40s, it documents the development of Augustine’s thought from childhood into his adult life – a life he considered in retrospect to be both sinful and immoral. He was in his early 30s before he converted to Christianity, but was soon ordained as a priest and became a bishop not long after.

‘Confessions’ not only documented his conversion but sought to offer guidance to others taking the same path. Considered to be the first Western autobiography to be written, Augustine’s work (including the subsequent ‘City of God’) became a major influence on Christian writers for the next 1,000 years and remains a much-valued contribution to Christian thinking.

This edition uses the classic translation from Latin by E.B. Pusey (1838) with a partial modernisation of the text to assist the modern reader.

Place your copy on hold here:  Catalog


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Other Selections Include:

September 21
Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc by Mark Twain

October 19
Affluent Society by John Kenneth Galbraith

November 16
The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston

December 21
Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich 

January 18
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

February 15
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

March 15
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

April 19
Go Tell It on the Mountian by James Baldwin

May 17
Confessions by St. Augustine


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Read the Classics Revisited Archive to see previous selections.

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